Pastoral Landscape with Stream Fisherman and Strollers, Henri Rousseau Framed Art Print

$72.00

Description

Henri Rousseau is considered the archetype of the modern naive artist. He is known for his richly coloured and meticulously detailed pictures of lush jungles, wild beasts, and exotic figures. After exhibiting with the Fauves in 1905, he gained the admiration of avant-garde artists. Rousseau was honoured with a retrospective exhibition at the Salon des Indépendants in 1911.

In 1912 the painter Wassily Kandinsky wrote admiringly about Rousseau in his Expressionist review Der Blue Reiter. In addition to inspiring an interest in naive art in the 20th century, he is also thought to have influenced the dreamscapes of Surrealist artists such as Paul Delvaux and Max Ernst.

Size Options

Available as an unframed fine art print or choose from a variety of frames and mounts.

All frames are made from responsibly sourced wood and are made in our Nottinghamshire workshop.

SIZING

Print size quoted is the printed area, with mounts varying from 1 inch wide for small prints and 2-3 inches wide for larger prints.

For example, the 8x10 inch print with white mount and white frame will measure approximately 10x14 inches overall and the 24x30 inch print with white mount and white frame will measure approximately 32x38 inches overall.

Frames are approximately one inch wide and one inch deep.

All prints are made using archival art stocks and UV pigment inks to give up to 200 years life. 

Frames and Mounts

FRAMES

All of our frames are custom made to order in our Nottinghamshire workshop. The wood for our frames is responsibly sourced from managed forests in the UK and EU.

All of our frames are fitted with a backing board with integral hanging points.

MOUNTS

Our mounts are cut from sustainable sourced acid free board.

GLAZING

Frames up to 16x20 inches are fitted with high clarity glass and larger frames are fitted with high quality acrylic which has the same visual clarity as our glass.

The Artist

Henri Julien Félix Rousseau (1844-1910) was a French post-impressionist painter in the Naïve or Primitive manner. He was also known as Le Douanier, a humorous description of his occupation as a toll and tax collector.

Rousseau claimed he had "no teacher other than nature" although he admitted he had received "some advice" from two established Academic painters, Félix Auguste Clément and Jean-Léon Gérôme. Essentially, he was self-taught and is considered to be a naïve or primitive painter.

His best-known paintings depict jungle scenes, even though he never left France or saw a jungle. Stories spread by admirers that his army service included the French expeditionary force to Mexico are unfounded. His inspiration came from illustrations in children's books and the botanical gardens in Paris, as well as tableaux of taxidermy wild animals. During his term of service, he had also met soldiers who had survived the French expedition to Mexico, and he listened to their stories of the subtropical country they had encountered. To the critic Arsène Alexandre, he described his frequent visits to the Jardin des Plantes: "When I go into the glass houses and I see the strange plants of exotic lands, it seems to me that I enter into a dream."

Along with his exotic scenes there was a concurrent output of smaller topographical images of the city and its suburbs.

He claimed to have invented a new genre of portrait landscape, which he achieved by starting a painting with a specific view, such as a favourite part of the city, and then depicting a person in the foreground.